Download Immigrant Rights in the Shadows of Citizenship PDF

Immigrant Rights in the Shadows of Citizenship

Author: Rachel Ida Buff
Publsiher: NYU Press
Total Pages: 448
Release: 2008-08-17
Genre: Social Science
ISBN: 0814789749
Rating: 4.9/5 (49 downloads)

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Punctuated by marches across the United States in the spring of 2006, immigrant rights has reemerged as a significant and highly visible political issue. Immigrant Rights in the Shadows of U.S. Citizenship brings prominent activists and scholars together to examine the emergence and significance of the contemporary immigrant rights movement. Contributors place the contemporary immigrant rights movement in historical and comparative contexts by looking at the ways immigrants and their allies have staked claims to rights in the past, and by examining movements based in different communities around the United States. Scholars explain the evolution of immigration policy, and analyze current conflicts around issues of immigrant rights; activists engaged in the current movement document the ways in which coalitions have been built among immigrants from different nations, and between immigrant and native born peoples. The essays examine the ways in which questions of immigrant rights engage broader issues of identity, including gender, race, and sexuality.

Download Immigrant Rights in the Shadows of Citizenship PDF

Immigrant Rights in the Shadows of Citizenship

Author: Rachel Ida Buff
Publsiher: NYU Press
Total Pages: 448
Release: 2008-08-17
Genre: Social Science
ISBN: 9780814799918
Rating: 4.4/5 (999 downloads)

Download Immigrant Rights in the Shadows of Citizenship Book in PDF, Epub and Kindle

Punctuated by marches across the United States in the spring of 2006, immigrant rights has reemerged as a significant and highly visible political issue. Immigrant Rights in the Shadows of U.S. Citizenship brings prominent activists and scholars together to examine the emergence and significance of the contemporary immigrant rights movement. Contributors place the contemporary immigrant rights movement in historical and comparative contexts by looking at the ways immigrants and their allies have staked claims to rights in the past, and by examining movements based in different communities around the United States. Scholars explain the evolution of immigration policy, and analyze current conflicts around issues of immigrant rights; activists engaged in the current movement document the ways in which coalitions have been built among immigrants from different nations, and between immigrant and native born peoples. The essays examine the ways in which questions of immigrant rights engage broader issues of identity, including gender, race, and sexuality.

Download The Paradox of Citizenship in American Politics PDF

The Paradox of Citizenship in American Politics

Author: Mehnaaz Momen
Publsiher: Springer
Total Pages: 265
Release: 2017-08-28
Genre: Political Science
ISBN: 3319615300
Rating: 4.5/5 ( downloads)

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“This remarkable book does the unusual: it embeds its focus in a larger complex operational space. The migrant, the refugee, the citizen, all emerge from that larger context. The focus is not the usual detailed examination of the subject herself, but that larger world of wars, grabs, contestations, and, importantly, the claimers and resisters.”— Saskia Sassen, Professor of Sociology, Columbia University, USA This thought-provoking book begins by looking at the incredible complexities of “American identity” and ends with the threats to civil liberties with the vast expansion of state power through technology. A must-read for anyone interested in the future of the promise and realities of citizenship in the modern global landscape.— Kevin R. Johnson, Dean, UC Davis School of Law, USA Momen focuses on the basic paradox that has long marked national identity: the divide between liberal egalitarian self-conception and persistent practices of exclusion and subordination. The result is a thought-provoking text that is sure to be of interest to scholars and students of the American experience. — Aziz Rana, Professor of Law, Cornell Law School, USA This book is an exploration of American citizenship, emphasizing the paradoxes that are contained, normalized, and strengthened by the gaps existing between proposed policies and real-life practices in multiple arenas of a citizen’s life. The book considers the evolution of citizenship through the journey of the American nation and its identity, its complexities of racial exclusion, its transformations in response to domestic demands and geopolitical challenges, its changing values captured in immigration policies and practices, and finally its dynamics in terms of the shift in state power vis-à-vis citizens. While it aspires to analyze the meaning of citizenship in America from the multiple perspectives of history, politics, and policy, it pays special attention to the critical junctures where rhetoric and reality clash, allowing for the production of certain paradoxes that define citizenship rights and shape political discourse.

Download Rallying for Immigrant Rights PDF

Rallying for Immigrant Rights

Author: Kim Voss
Publsiher: Univ of California Press
Total Pages: 334
Release: 2011-06-11
Genre: Social Science
ISBN: 0520267540
Rating: 4.7/5 (4 downloads)

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“Through the excellent and noteworthy pieces of scholarship here, Rallying for Immigrant Rights vividly captures the dynamics of the 2006 immigration protests. This volume heralds an exciting shift in the study of political participation and raises timely questions about protest, immigration, and U.S. politics.” —Kenneth T. Andrews, author of Freedom is a Constant Struggle: The Mississippi Civil Rights Movement and Its Legacy “Rallying for Immigrant Rights challenges the existing theories in political behavior and social movement writings. This is a timely and excellent volume, and it should be required reading for anyone interested in political activism.” —Lisa García Bedolla, Chair, Center for Latino Policy Research, UC Berkeley “The essays in Rallying for Immigrant Rights offer an enlightening perspective on the 2006 protests and what they mean for the future of immigration politics in the U.S. This impressively orginal volume will be a standard reference for years to come.” —Karthick Ramakrishnan, Associate Professor of Political Science, UC Riverside

Download Against the Deportation Terror PDF

Against the Deportation Terror

Author: Rachel Buff
Publsiher: Temple University Press
Total Pages: 298
Release: 2018
Genre: History
ISBN: 1439915342
Rating: 4.5/5 (42 downloads)

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Despite being characterized as a “nation of immigrants,” the United States has seen a long history of immigrant rights struggles. In her timely book Against the Deportation Terror, Rachel Ida Buff uncovers this multiracial history. She traces the story of the American Committee for the Protection of the Foreign Born (ACPFB) from its origins in the 1930s through repression during the early Cold War, to engagement with “new” Latinx and Caribbean immigrants in the 1970s and early 1980s. Functioning as a hub connecting diverse foreign-born communities and racial justice advocates, the ACPFB responded to various, ongoing crises of what they called “the deportation terror.” Advocates worked against repression, discrimination, detention, and expulsion in migrant communities across the nation at the same time as they supported reform of federal immigration policy. Prevailing in some cases and suffering defeats in others, the story of the ACPFB is characterized by persistence in multiracial organizing even during periods of protracted repression. By tracing the work of the ACPFB and its allies over half a century, Against the Deportation Terror provides important historical precedent for contemporary immigrant rights organizing. Its lessons continue to resonate today.

Download Migrant Citizenship PDF

Migrant Citizenship

Author: Veronica Martinez-Matsuda
Publsiher: University of Pennsylvania Press
Total Pages: 352
Release: 2020-06-26
Genre: History
ISBN: 0812252292
Rating: 4.2/5 (92 downloads)

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An examination of the Farm Security Administration's migrant camp system and the people it served Today's concern for the quality of the produce on our plates has done little to guarantee U.S. farmworkers the necessary protections of sanitary housing, medical attention, and fair labor standards. The political discourse on farmworkers' rights is dominated by the view that migrant workers are not entitled to better protections because they are "noncitizens," as either immigrants or transients. Between 1935 and 1946, however, the Farm Security Administration (FSA) intervened dramatically on behalf of migrant families to expand the principles of American democracy, advance migrants' civil rights, and make farmworkers visible beyond their economic role as temporary laborers. In more than one hundred labor camps across the country, migrant families successfully worked with FSA officials to challenge their exclusion from the basic rights afforded by the New Deal. In Migrant Citizenship, Verónica Martínez-Matsuda examines the history of the FSA's Migratory Labor Camp Program and its role in the lives of diverse farmworker families across the United States, describing how the camps provided migrants sanitary housing, full on-site medical service, a nursery school program, primary education, home-demonstration instruction, food for a healthy diet, recreational programing, and lessons in participatory democracy through self-governing councils. In these ways, she argues, the camps functioned as more than just labor centers aimed at improving agribusiness efficiency. Instead, they represented a profound "experiment in democracy" seeking to secure migrant farmworkers' full political and social participation in the United States. In recounting this chapter in the FSA's history, Migrant Citizenship provides insights into public policy concerning migrant workers, federal intervention in poor people's lives, and workers' cross-racial movements for social justice and offers a precedent for those seeking to combat the precarity in farm labor relations today.

Download No Justice in the Shadows PDF

No Justice in the Shadows

Author: Alina Das
Publsiher: Hachette UK
Total Pages: 272
Release: 2020-04-14
Genre: Political Science
ISBN: 156858945X
Rating: 4.9/5 (5 downloads)

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This provocative account of our immigration system's long, racist history reveals how it has become the brutal machine that upends the lives of millions of immigrants today. Each year in the United States, hundreds of thousands of people are arrested, imprisoned, and deported, trapped in what leading immigrant rights activist and lawyer Alina Das calls the "deportation machine." The bulk of the arrests target people who have a criminal record -- so-called "criminal aliens" -- the majority of whose offenses are immigration-, drug-, or traffic-related. These individuals are uprooted and banished from their homes, their families, and their communities. Through the stories of those caught in the system, Das traces the ugly history of immigration policy to explain how the U.S. constructed the idea of the "criminal alien," effectively dividing immigrants into the categories "good" and "bad," "deserving" and "undeserving." As Das argues, we need to confront the cruelty of the machine so that we can build an inclusive immigration policy premised on human dignity and break the cycle once and for all.

Download Cultural Studies and the 'Juridical Turn' PDF

Cultural Studies and the 'Juridical Turn'

Author: Jaafar Aksikas
Publsiher: Routledge
Total Pages: 384
Release: 2018-02-02
Genre: Social Science
ISBN: 1317244796
Rating: 4.4/5 (96 downloads)

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The relationship between culture and the law has become an emergent concern within contemporary Cultural Studies as a field, but the recent focus has been largely limited to the role played by cultural representations and identity politics in the legitimation of legal discourse and policies. While continuing this emphasis, this collection also looks at the law itself as a cultural production, tracing some of the specific contours of its function in the last three decades. It argues that, with the onset of neoliberal or late capitalism, the law has taken on a new specificity and power, leading to what we are calling the ‘juridical turn’, where the presumed legitimacy of the law makes other forms of hegemonic struggle secondary. The collection not only charts the law and cultural policy as they exert their powerful—if often overlooked—influence on every aspect of society and culture, but it also seeks to define this important field of study and demonstrate the substantial role law plays in the production of our social and cultural worlds. In this trailblazing collection of contributions by leading and emerging figures in the field of cultural legal studies, chapters examine various ways in which this process is manifested, such as U.S. legislation and Supreme Court Decisions on gay marriage, immigration, consumer finance, welfare, copyright, and so-called victim’s rights, along with international comparisons from Europe and Latin America. It promises to be a pathbreaking analysis of our juridically-determined conjuncture. This book was originally published as a special issue of Cultural Studies.

Download Citizens of Asian America PDF

Citizens of Asian America

Author: Cindy I-Fen Cheng
Publsiher: NYU Press
Total Pages: 285
Release: 2014-10-22
Genre: History
ISBN: 1479880736
Rating: 4.0/5 (36 downloads)

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Winner, 2013-2014 Asian/Pacific American Award for Literature, Adult Non-Fiction presented by the Asian Pacific American Librarian Association During the Cold War, Soviet propaganda highlighted U.S. racism in order to undermine the credibility of U.S. democracy. In response, incorporating racial and ethnic minorities in order to affirm that America worked to ensure the rights of all and was superior to communist countries became a national imperative. In Citizens of Asian America, Cindy I-Fen Cheng explores how Asian Americans figured in this effort to shape the credibility of American democracy, even while the perceived “foreignness” of Asian Americans cast them as likely alien subversives whose activities needed monitoring following the communist revolution in China and the outbreak of the Korean War. While histories of international politics and U.S. race relations during the Cold War have largely overlooked the significance of Asian Americans, Cheng challenges the black-white focus of the existing historiography. She highlights how Asian Americans made use of the government’s desire to be leader of the “free world” by advocating for civil rights reforms, such as housing integration, increased professional opportunities, and freedom from political persecution. Further, Cheng examines the liberalization of immigration policies, which worked not only to increase the civil rights of Asian Americans but also to improve the nation’s ties with Asian countries, providing an opportunity for the U.S. government to broadcast, on a global scale, the freedom and opportunity that American society could offer.

Download In the Shadow of the Statue of Liberty PDF

In the Shadow of the Statue of Liberty

Author: Marianne Debouzy
Publsiher: University of Illinois Press
Total Pages: 340
Release: 1992
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780252062520
Rating: 4.2/5 (625 downloads)

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Download The Cultural Politics of U.S. Immigration PDF

The Cultural Politics of U.S. Immigration

Author: Leah Perry
Publsiher: NYU Press
Total Pages: 299
Release: 2016-09-27
Genre: Social Science
ISBN: 1479828777
Rating: 4.8/5 (77 downloads)

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How the immigration policies and popular culture of the 1980's fused to shape modern views on democracy In the 1980s, amid increasing immigration from Latin America, the Caribbean, and Asia, the circle of who was considered American seemed to broaden, reflecting the democratic gains made by racial minorities and women. Although this expanded circle was increasingly visible in the daily lives of Americans through TV shows, films, and popular news media, these gains were circumscribed by the discourse that certain immigrants, for instance single and working mothers, were feared, censured, or welcomed exclusively as laborers. In The Cultural Politics of U.S. Immigration, Leah Perry argues that 1980s immigration discourse in law and popular media was a crucial ingredient in the cohesion of the neoliberal idea of democracy. Blending critical legal analysis with a feminist media studies methodology over a range of sources, including legal documents, congressional debates, and popular media, such as Golden Girls, Who’s the Boss?, Scarface, and Mi Vida Loca, Perry shows how even while “multicultural” immigrants were embraced, they were at the same time disciplined through gendered discourses of respectability. Examining the relationship between law and culture, this book weaves questions of legal status and gender into existing discussions about race and ethnicity to revise our understanding of both neoliberalism and immigration.

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Girlhood in the Borderlands

Author: Lilia Soto
Publsiher: NYU Press
Total Pages: 257
Release: 2018-07-31
Genre: Social Science
ISBN: 1479838403
Rating: 4.8/5 (3 downloads)

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Introduction -- The why of transnational familial formations -- Growing up transnational: Mexican teenage girls and their transnational familial arrangements -- Muchachas Michoacanas: portraits of adolescent girls in a migratory town -- Migration marks: time, waiting, and desires for migration -- The telling moment: pre-crossings of Mexican teenage girls and their journeys to the border -- Imaginaries and realities: encountering the Napa Valley -- Conclusion

Download Within and Beyond Citizenship PDF

Within and Beyond Citizenship

Author: Roberto G. Gonzales
Publsiher: Taylor & Francis
Total Pages: 189
Release: 2017-07-06
Genre: Political Science
ISBN: 1351977474
Rating: 4.7/5 (74 downloads)

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Illegality and the limits of political action -- Concluding thoughts: citizenship acts without citizenship -- Notes -- References -- 7. Squatting as a practice of citizenship: The experiences of Moroccan immigrant women in Rome -- Boundaries of citizenship -- Squatting in houses in Rome -- Muslim immigrant women squatting in houses as political subjects -- Gendered citizenship -- Conclusions -- Notes -- References -- 8. Voice matters: Calling for victimhood, shared humanity and citizenry of irregular migrants in Norway -- Voice, narratives and the political -- Being an irregular in Norway -- Giving an account of themselves -- Creating a platform of recognition -- Conclusions -- Notes -- References -- 9. Marching beyond borders: Non-citizen citizenship and transnational undocumented activism in Europe -- A march for freedom -- Contesting illegality in Europe -- The apparent paradox of non-citizen citizenship -- Going international: the Parisian marching call -- Crossing borders: the re-encounter with the nation-state -- Beyond the nation? Claims-making and the European democratic deficit -- Conclusion: citizenship beyond borders? -- Notes -- References -- 10. Boundary practices of citizenship: Europe's Roma at the nexus of securitization and citizenship -- Beyond the dramatic and momentary character of acts of citizenship -- Examining the securitization of Roma in Europe -- Temporary suspension of deportation and the permanent state of precarity -- Networks of resistance and boundary practices of citizenship -- References -- 11. The unworthy citizen: A brief commentary -- Introduction -- Naturalization -- The welfare recipient -- The home grown terrorist -- The paedophile -- Conclusion -- Notes -- References -- Index

Download The Immigration and Ethnic History Newsletter PDF

The Immigration and Ethnic History Newsletter

Author:
Publsiher:
Total Pages:
Release: 2008
Genre: Minorities
ISBN:
Rating: 4./5 ( downloads)

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Download The Qualities of a Citizen PDF

The Qualities of a Citizen

Author: Martha Mabie Gardner
Publsiher: Princeton University Press
Total Pages: 280
Release: 2005
Genre: History
ISBN: 0691089930
Rating: 4.9/5 (3 downloads)

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The Qualities of a Citizen traces the application of U.S. immigration and naturalization law to women from the 1870s to the late 1960s. Like no other book before, it explores how racialized, gendered, and historical anxieties shaped our current understandings of the histories of immigrant women. The book takes us from the first federal immigration restrictions against Asian prostitutes in the 1870s to the immigration "reform" measures of the late 1960s. Throughout this period, topics such as morality, family, marriage, poverty, and nationality structured historical debates over women's immigration and citizenship. At the border, women immigrants, immigration officials, social service providers, and federal judges argued the grounds on which women would be included within the nation. As interview transcripts and court documents reveal, when, where, and how women were welcomed into the country depended on their racial status, their roles in the family, and their work skills. Gender and race mattered. The book emphasizes the comparative nature of racial ideologies in which the inclusion of one group often came with the exclusion of another. It explores how U.S. officials insisted on the link between race and gender in understanding America's peculiar brand of nationalism. It also serves as a social history of the law, detailing women's experiences and strategies, successes and failures, to belong to the nation.

Download UC Irvine Law Review PDF

UC Irvine Law Review

Author:
Publsiher:
Total Pages: 868
Release: 2013
Genre: Law reviews
ISBN:
Rating: 4./5 ( downloads)

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Download We Are Not Dreamers PDF

We Are Not Dreamers

Author: Leisy J. Abrego
Publsiher: Duke University Press
Total Pages: 263
Release: 2020-08-14
Genre: Social Science
ISBN: 1478012382
Rating: 4.2/5 (82 downloads)

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The widely recognized “Dreamer narrative” celebrates the educational and economic achievements of undocumented youth to justify a path to citizenship. While a well-intentioned, strategic tactic to garner political support of undocumented youth, it has promoted the idea that access to citizenship and rights should be granted only to a select group of “deserving” immigrants. The contributors to We Are Not Dreamers—themselves currently or formerly undocumented—poignantly counter the Dreamer narrative by grappling with the nuances of undocumented life in this country. Theorizing those excluded from the Dreamer category—academically struggling students, transgender activists, and queer undocumented parents—the contributors call for an expansive articulation of immigrant rights and justice that recognizes the full humanity of undocumented immigrants while granting full and unconditional rights. Illuminating how various institutions reproduce and benefit from exclusionary narratives, this volume articulates the dangers of the Dreamer narrative and envisions a different way forward. Contributors. Leisy J. Abrego, Gabrielle Cabrera, Gabriela Garcia Cruz, Lucía León, Katy Joseline Maldonado Dominguez, Grecia Mondragón, Gabriela Monico, Genevieve Negrón-Gonzales, Maria Liliana Ramirez, Joel Sati, Audrey Silvestre, Carolina Valdivia